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Industry and Occupation Categories

Research indicates that rates of heavy alcohol and illicit drug use, and alcohol and illicit drug dependence and abuse vary across industries and occupations. Employers test for alcohol or drug use during the hiring process and on a random basis at differing rates as well. These statistics can be viewed by Industry Category or Occupation Category:

INDUSTRY CATEGORIES

OCCUPATIONAL CATEGORIES

The information pertains to full-time workers aged 18 to 64 and was sourced from the Worker Substance Use and Workplace Policies and Programs report published in 2007 by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration for the years 2002-2004 combined. The report’s statistics were originally generated from face-to-face interviews with a representative sample of the population.

[i] Larson, S.L., Eyerman, J., Foster, M.S., and Gfroerer, J.C. (2007). Worker Substance Use and Workplace Policies and Programs (DHHS Publication No. SMA 07-4273, Analytic Series A-29). Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies.

The North American Industry Classification System (which categorizes all industries into 19 major groups) and the 2000 Standard Occupational Classification released by the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics (which categorizes all occupations into 21 major groups) were used to classify industries and occupations in the Worker Substance Use and Workplace Policies and Programs report. Details are available in the report’s Appendix D: Occupational and Industry Classifications.

Industry Categories relate to the industry in which a person works, regardless of occupation. For example, a company’s chief executive (whose occupational classification is Executive, Administrative and Managerial Occupations), bookkeeper (whose occupational classification is Office and Administrative Support Workers) and cafeteria cook (whose occupational classification is Food Preparation and Serving Related Occupations) are all included in the same data set corresponding to the employer’s industry classification.

Occupation Categories relate to the occupation in which a person works, regardless of industry. For example, bookkeepers in the Construction, Manufacturing and Retail Trade are all included in the Office and Administrative Support data set.